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Field of Dreams

Every once in a while it comes to my attention that I failed to see a movie which has great pop culture relevance. These are films I probably should have seen when I was younger but it missed me and everyone else saw it so when I realize not seeing this movie is a problem I can’t find anyone to watch it with me because they’ve already seen it. Sigh. Usually these are movies I know something about through pop culture osmosis, so by the time I get around to actually watching it, I have assembled a vague plot outline in my head. Sometime my outline is way off and sometimes I prefer my version better.
The other night, Hubby realized I had never seen Field of Dreams. He decided to quickly rectify this as he’s a sucker for baseball movies and this one in particular never fails to make him cry. I knew a bit about this one. I knew it was about Kevin Costner building a baseball field because a voice told him “If you build it, he will come”, and I knew “Shoeless” Joe was a central part of the film, and I knew at the end Costner plays catch with his dead dad. However, there’s a bunch of other stuff in this movie that I totally wasn’t expecting.
I was really surprised that the field gets built in the first act of the movie. I guess I imagine act one would be him hearing the voice and figuring out what it means, act two is building the field, and at the end he meets the baseball players and reunites with his dad. The quickness with which he translate the message, gets his wife on board, builds the field, and then meets the Black Sox team a bit jarring.
Was not expecting all the stuff with writer Terrance Mann (James Earl Jones) and the doctor and am not really sure what it adds to story overall. I understand how the 1919 White Sox and Terrance Mann fit into the breakdown of Costner’s relationship with his father but it sure seems like a lot of people had to be involved just one guy can reconcile with his dad. And then all those people heading to the field at the end? All those people had to get in their car and drive all the way to Iowa just so two men could have a catch? It seems a little much ado about nothing.
This does not mean I didn’t like the film. The cast is strong, I particularly liked Amy Madigan as Costner’s file Annie, even though I found him way too pretty for her. James Earl Jones is fun in it as the cranky writer. It’s a good reminder that families get a limited time together so we should do our best to not let pettiness get in the way. While it’s not exactly the film I was expecting, I would still recommend it to anyone who like films about baseball or may need to call their dad.

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About amandalovesmovies

Lifelong movie lover who's ready to share her two cents with the world! Follow me on twitter @tuxedopengin

5 responses to “Field of Dreams

  1. Interesting thoughts about FIELD OF DREAMS. I can’t say our opinions about it are 180 degrees, because you sorta/kinda like it. For me, it’s the best movie ever made. Maybe it’s a guy thing. I wrote about it in detail on my blog, “Swords, Specters, & Stuff,” a post titlted, “So Glad Shoeless Joe Came to Iowa,” and I also wrote about W.P. Kinsella, its author, in a post called, “Searching For January.” Have a look, and see what you think.

    • amandalovesmovies ⋅

      I think it was more that it wasn’t exactly what I expected and that threw me off. It always makes hubby cries!

      • Mike Sirota ⋅

        Yeah, it does the same to me. I imagine you’ve seen FREQUENCY, or your husband has. Its genre(s) is father-son relationship, baseball, time travel, serial killer. It can pull a few tears also. Super movie.

      • amandalovesmovies ⋅

        I haven’t seen that one, does it involve a ham radio? If so, my dad got really into it. Will have to recommend it to hubby if he hasn’t seen it.

      • Mike Sirota ⋅

        That’s the one. Dennis Quaid and Jim Caviezel. Totally improbable plot, but fun, and touching. Enjoy.

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